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Easter in China

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESSAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES People of many countries, colors, and cultures celebrated Easter together at Hangzhou International Christian Fellowship in eastern China on April 5, 2015.  The church was packed, and many people stood or sat at the sides and sang joyfully together to celebrate that God loved the whole world so much that He sent His Son, Jesus, to die for sins of everyone and then rise again with a promise of eternal life.  The Nigerian pastor spoke about Christ’s resurrection and message of love, hope, and unity.  Asians, Africans, Europeans, Middle Easterners, North and South Americans, and others posed among spring flowers on this special day as 2 billion more earthlings in different time zones joined the song of life in a world that too often promotes death. This year, Easter came just after Good Friday, the day Christians remember Christ’s sacrificial death, which also fell on the first night of Passover.  A blood moon eclipse also appeared on Passover.  China’s national holiday, Tomb Sweeping Day, was the same day as Easter.  During Tomb Sweeping Day, Chinese people honor their ancestors by cleaning graves and placing special items on them.  They also take a spring outing with their family and wear flowers or leaves on their heads. Read about my experiences with Easter in my books.  Watch videos of the Hangzhou church singing together, women dancing, and children giving a special presentation.  See me teach about Passover and Easter.  Celebrate!

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Christmas Lights in China

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My daughter Jessica was born in September, so by her first Christmas she was old enough for me to carry around and look at Christmas lights.  Her small blue eyes widened at the amazing colors and brightness.  Now she is 22 and lives in California.  I am teaching English in China.  This is my 5th Christmas away from home.  I went out last night to a colorful, cobblestoned street by the river in my Chinese city near Shanghai and was amazed at how the lights lit up like a fairly-land.  I thought, “Jessica could see this.”

There’s so much that we do not see when we don’t take opportunities.  I asked Jessica to come with me to China, but she stayed home.  Maybe she will come for a visit after Christmas.  I would like to show her this street, these fairy lights that also remind me of stars and of Jesus.  He said, “I am the light of the world.”  He was born in a stable on a hillside by a small town in a little country.  Only Mary and Joseph, a few shepherds, and some weary wise men saw Him, under a bright star, surrounded by the temporary visit of angels who announced Good News.  The angels spoke of joy, hope for a dark world, and a never-ending future, like a fairy tale that’s true, for any who would take time to look.

I dedicate this little post to Jessica Ruth Williams and hope she will come here to China where so much waits for exploring.

If you like my photos, check out my books:

http://www.amazon.com/Lonna-Lisa-Williams/e/B006ZISIFU

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Autumn in China

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESGinkoa Biloba leaves blanketed the courtyard outside the high school classes where I teach English near Shanghai, China.  This colorful display cheered my students and me.  Later we went to Starbucks to celebrate a strange kind of Thanksgiving with a student’s birthday cake and flavored coffee.  Half of the students paid attention to my speech about Thanksgiving, and the other half played with their mobile phones.  Such is life in China.  If you like my blogs, please check out my books.

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Unexpected China

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China always surprises me.  I find the most unexpected things in the country where I’ve been teaching English for the past 9 months.  My life often feels surreal, like I’ve wondered into another universe.  When I was walking by the Songhua River in Jilin Province (northeast), I spotted these giant fake flowers that were left over from the Dragon Festival.  They were near the entrance to the dragon boats.  See more photos and enjoy the serendipity of China with me.

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Amazing Chinese Rooms

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I’ve always loved exploring hotels.  They have endless hallways and so many different types of rooms, nooks, artwork, and cafes.  See various rooms from hotels all over China, like the elegant blue one (above), where you can relax with a cup of tea; and the techno red KTV room (below), where scantily-clothed women will feed you nuts and alcohol while you sing and dance to music.

See more Chinese hotel photos here and explore more rooms.

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Freedom Is Fleeting in Turkey

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I lived and taught English in Turkey for 2.5 years.  I fell in love with that beautiful country and even married a Turkish man.  When the Gezi Park freedom protests began a year ago today, I covered them first-hand, writing articles, taking photos, and uploading videos.  I even got attacked by the Turkish police, and my Turkish husband was tortured by them.  We left Turkey days before police showed up at our old apartment near Istanbul to arrest me for a photo I’d published.

Of all the photos I took in Turkey, this one defined a turning point.  I was in Antalya, watching some high school students march with the Turkish flag even though their Islamist Prime Minister had forbidden any parades.  I stopped being just an American English teacher and became part of the Turkish people when I witnessed how much they want freedom.

Read my tribute to the Gezi Park protest anniversary here:

http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/world/a-year-after-turkey-s-gezi-park-protests-freedom-elusive/article/385149

Songhua River Walk in Jilin, China

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This colorful metallic boat is nestled along the Songhua River walk in Jilin City, Jilin, China.  Jilin City is located in Jilin Province, northeast China. I have been teaching English at a high school there for the past 9 months. The high school is near the Songhua River that stretches from Russia, through China, to North Korea. After teaching, I often walk along the river and enjoy the buildings, trees, parks, and interesting people. After dark, the river reflects colorful lights of buildings andbridges. Walk with me here and get a glimpse of China you may never have seen before.

See more photos of this amazing place on Digital Journal:

http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/world/photo-essay-songhua-river-walk-in-jilin-china/article/384535

China’s Ming Tombs

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We, the living, are often fascinated by tombs.  We can’t resist the chance to tour them, view mummies, and read about possible curses associated with disturbing the dead.  Enjoy my story of reflection as I toured China’s Ming Tombs:

Even though it was winter, the valley looked beautiful. It reached from a lake, past fruit trees, and toward several hills below mountains. Laid out in the harmonious “feng shui” design by the third Ming Dynasty emperor Yongle (1402–1424), the Ming Tombs are just 26 miles northeast of Beijing and definitely worth a visit.

Emperor Yongle moved the capital of China from Nanjing to its the present location in Beijing. After construction of the Imperial Palace (the Forbidden City) in 1420, Yongle selected his burial site and created his own mausoleum. The valley features tombs of 13 of the Ming Dynasty Emperors, some Empresses, and a royal eunuch. The tombs are spread out across the valley, many on top of hills. A great red gate marks the entrance to a road lined with huge stone statues of guardian animals and officials. Stone and waterways are strategically placed to guard against bad winds, according to Feng Shui, and create a balance between humans and nature. Continue reading

Beijing’s Stone Gardens

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After an exhausting day of climbing the Great Wall of China and wandering around the Ming Tombs, our Chinese tour guide ended the day at Yuan Ming Yuan Gardens on the outskirts of Beijing. Luckily, we were given rides in electric cars to a gate where we wandered through the Western Mansions section of what was called the Old Summer Palace, where only Qing Emperors and their royal courts could live and conduct affairs of state (the Forbidden City was used for more formal affairs).

At first I wondered why I had to explore the ruins of stone fountains and great halls by twilight when I just wanted to fall into bed, but as I walked across broken marble and listened to the tour guide tell its story, I began to understand the significance of Yuan Ming Yuan to the Chinese people. Yuan Ming Yuan means “The Gardens of Perfect Brightness,” and in its day, it must have reflected the most glorious mix of old-style Chinese temples, pagodas, and galleries with Tibetan and Mongol architecture. In one corner, European-inspired mansions rose above dancing waterfalls, rivers, bridges, and forested hills. Thousands of priceless artifacts such as ancient Chinese vases, gold figurines, carved jade, and intricate paintings once filled the now-ruined complex. Continue reading