Walk with Me to Turkey’s Kar Tepe Mountain

I was teaching basic English to private language school students on weekends when I decided it was time for a field trip. Since I had often stood in Izmit, Kocaeli by the banks of the Marmara Sea and looked up at the distant mountains, I thought of traveling to Kar Tepe, the tallest peak in Kocaeli and home to a five-star hotel and challenging ski resort.

The only way to get up the mountain is by car, since the buses only go to the village of Kar Tepe at the base of the mountain. The paved road is well cared for, thanks in part to business from wealthy Istanbul residents who want to ski at the closest location. One of my students offered to drive our small group, and we left early on a Saturday morning in September.

The air was cool, and mist covered the summit as we ascended the windy road. We stopped near the ski resort, at a quaint cabin cafe, for coffee next to a wood-burning fireplace. After our cozy break, we wandered into the evergreen forest and took photos of amazing vegetation beside ancient trees, hoping to glimpse a deer or bear that might wander by.

“Wild boars often come this way,” one of my students told me. “They have dangerous tusks that can kill a hunter.”

“Oh, I’ll be careful! Are there also coyotes?” I asked.

“We call them jackals,” another student replied with a smile, “and we often call dishonest people that name.”

We drove to the end of the road and took photos of ski lifts that edged down toward the Greenpark Hotel, half hidden in the mist. Then we traveled to the five-star hotel itself and wandered through the expensive hallways and restaurants, the friendly staff giving us a private tour. I was impressed by the mix of modern amenities and Ottoman paintings.

Since we couldn’t afford lunch at the hotel’s outdoor cafe with view of cabins and ski runs, we drove to a small cafe along the descending highway. A woman made Turkish cheese bread on a wood-burning stove, and we sat by the railing, enjoying our strong tea (“çay” in Turkish, pronounced “chai”) in its brass, two-layered teapot design with the tea on top and hot water below. We gazed at the distant view of Lake Sopanca before heading back down to Izmit, thankful for our day in one of Turkey’s mountains.

I will use photos to illustrate my trip to Kar Tepe, one scenic step at a time as I invite you to walk with me through this amazing place.

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The windy road up Kar Tepe mountain, with Sopanca Lake in the background

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We stopped at this forest cafe near the summit

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and my students enjoyed coffee by the fireplace

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After coffee, we ventured outside into the misty forest

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As sun broke through the mist, we discovered trees with entwined roots

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mossy trunks

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and amazing plants called “yaprak” in Turkish

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One student insisted that I pose in this mystical place as he snapped my photo

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We got back in the car and drove to a viewpoint for the Greenpark Hotel

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We drove down to the hotel’s entrance

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Walked past its cliffside cafe

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Admired its lobby

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staircase

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and gift shop

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before leaving the hotel

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taking one last look at the ski resort

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and stopping for a cup of Turkish tea at a roadside cafe 

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If you liked this journey to Kar Tepe mountain, see a slightly different version here.

If you like my stories, please buy one of my paperbacks or eBooks.

Thanks for walking with me on this Turkish adventure.

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2 comments on “Walk with Me to Turkey’s Kar Tepe Mountain

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